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Savannah-Chatham School board looking to add ‘vaping products’ to anti-tobacco policy


More concerns over the number of young children who are now vaping and using e-cigarettes.Vaping and e-cigarette use is prohibited for students in Savannah-Chatham County schools but the district is also looking to ban those products for employees.”We’ve been struggling with the vaping issues in our schools for some years but recently we’ve seen a national attention on the real health risk,” said Julie Wade, Savannah-Chatham school board member.And now more is being done to decrease the health risk.”We know it continues to be a problem in our schools, and I think we’re learning more and more that the overall practice is dangerous,” said Wade.The Savannah-Chatham School Board says it may soon add “vaping products” to its employee tobacco use policy.This move would ban all district employees from using vaping products on campus, at district events or when they are representing Savannah-Chatham schools.”We’re messaging to our students, that we don’t want anyone engaged in unhealthy conduct,” said Wade.The Savannah-Chatham school district says nurses have reported just under 10% of students use vaping products on campus.”Students aren’t allowed to have these on campuses and usually when we see them using, it’s in the parking lot, off campus activities and gatherings,” said Lisa Wilson, lead nurse for the district.District health officials say students who use them range from middle schoolers to high schoolers, who are attracted by the many colorful tobacco names, attractive odors and products that are easy to hide , like a Juul.But regardless of who’s vaping, health officials say some of these products are not safe.”When heated and turned into an aerosol, it can go really, really deep into lung, and irritate it, and cause permanent scarring; then when that happens, you have shortness of breath, a cough, then you have chest pain and those things are not reversible. We must keep all students cautious.”District health officials say another concern for vaping products is what’s exactly in them and the long-term effects they can cause.The Georgia Department of Health says young users of vaping or e-cigarette products can now access the new e-cigarette quit program by texting “ditchjuul” to 88709.

More concerns over the number of young children who are now vaping and using e-cigarettes.

Vaping and e-cigarette use is prohibited for students in Savannah-Chatham County schools but the district is also looking to ban those products for employees.

“We’ve been struggling with the vaping issues in our schools for some years but recently we’ve seen a national attention on the real health risk,” said Julie Wade, Savannah-Chatham school board member.

And now more is being done to decrease the health risk.

“We know it continues to be a problem in our schools, and I think we’re learning more and more that the overall practice is dangerous,” said Wade.

The Savannah-Chatham School Board says it may soon add “vaping products” to its employee tobacco use policy.

This move would ban all district employees from using vaping products on campus, at district events or when they are representing Savannah-Chatham schools.

“We’re messaging to our students, that we don’t want anyone engaged in unhealthy conduct,” said Wade.

The Savannah-Chatham school district says nurses have reported just under 10% of students use vaping products on campus.

“Students aren’t allowed to have these on campuses and usually when we see them using, it’s in the parking lot, off campus activities and gatherings,” said Lisa Wilson, lead nurse for the district.

District health officials say students who use them range from middle schoolers to high schoolers, who are attracted by the many colorful tobacco names, attractive odors and products that are easy to hide , like a Juul.

But regardless of who’s vaping, health officials say some of these products are not safe.

“When heated and turned into an aerosol, it can go really, really deep into lung, and irritate it, and cause permanent scarring; then when that happens, you have shortness of breath, a cough, then you have chest pain and those things are not reversible. We must keep all students cautious.”

District health officials say another concern for vaping products is what’s exactly in them and the long-term effects they can cause.

The Georgia Department of Health says young users of vaping or e-cigarette products can now access the new e-cigarette quit program by texting “ditchjuul” to 88709.



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